The #IMMOOC experience

For me the #IMMOOC experience was a chance to read the book again, get into some consistent blogging, and connect with educators around the world who share a passion for student learning. I absolutely loved the Youtube live videos. It was amazing to see and hear people live while tweeting and commenting in the video chat. The twitter chats were so fast! I’m used to slower ones that I can read every tweet and I just had to let go of the fact that that was not going to happen. I enjoyed the sidebar conversations. And that they were actually allowed and encouraged! I embraced the opportunity for some personalized professional development!

I am going to try blogging weekly. I’m going to attempt to do that until the end of 2017. I’ve had my blog since November 2016 so I’m going to round out year 1 with 1 post a week and then revisit this goal in 2018. I’m also setting a goal to continue reading education books and blogs on a regular basis! I’m going to start with a book study on The Curious Classroom with my team, bestie Caitlin McCommons, and our IRT Jessica VonDerHeide. I’m really excited to dig into this book and work on growth for my PDP goal of including more inquiry based learning in my classroom.

After this process of connecting, learning, and growing through the #IMMOOC family, I’m left with a question. It has been on my mind the whole 6 weeks and I haven’t found a good time to bring it up. How does all of this innovation fit in to equity in education? Is innovation in education yet another way that sets communities apart from one another?

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#eduawesome #IMMOOC blog posts

  1. Michelle Schade – I started reading her blog because she commented on my first #IMMOOC blog post. I feel like we have so much in common even though we are in totally different positions. I can’t pick just one post. I connected to everything she wrote during this process. I’m so excited to see what she does next! I’ll continue to read your blog as long as you continue to write! @MichelleSchad20
  2. It Starts with a Screw – Kristin wrote about setting up a workbench in her kindergarten classroom and referenced my all time favorite children’s book What do you do with an Idea?. I’m so inspired by her risk taking and connections her environment makes to the real world. What an amazing opportunity these kindergarteners have to work and build on a real workbench with real tools. I can’t wait to see what they do next! Please continue to share your journey! @KLHouston3
  3. I think Katie Martin’s homework blog post won #IMMOOC this season. Everyone connected with it. Everyone shared it – even people not in #IMMOOC we’re sharing that post. It almost broke the internet! But seriously, why are we still giving homework?!?! @KatieMartinEDU

Strengths Based Approach (3 blog posts under 250 words – post 2) #IMMOOC

Feedback is the most influential, powerful practice teachers can implement in their classrooms. Research (Hattie) shows that no single other practice in a classroom has a greater impact on student learning than feedback. However, how often does feedback come in the form of negatives.

  • “You need to start your sentence with a capital.”
  • “Did that sound right? Try a different strategy.”
  • “Check your counting. You made a silly mistake. “

I’m guilty of this type of feedback myself. I think I’m helping my students. But what message are they actually hearing? I worry that it could be:

  • “I’m a terrible writer.”
  • “I can’t read.”
  • “I’m not good enough.”

I have to be mindful daily to focus on my students strengths. It’s a decision I have to make every 5 seconds: tell them what they did great or what they need to fix.

I find that I get my fristies’ attention and interest when I start with something they did great. They love to hear how amazing they are. I try to make a point of telling each of my firsties something I love about them every day. They need this positive affirmation.

Today on flipgrid, one of my firsties was WAY off in her response but I didn’t even address it right away. I started by telling her how amazing she is at selfies (and she’s better than I am!) She lit up and hung on my every word after that! We hit her grow area after she was able to glow!

Purposeful Focus Areas (3 blog posts under 250 words – post 1) #IMMOOC #ObserveMe

I try to pick 2-3 areas I want to improve on each school year. This summer I was introduced to the #ObserveMe challenge. Teachers post a sign outside their door, share on social media to invite others into their rooms to observe them and provide feedback.

This year my focus areas are:

  1. Student collaboration
  2. Evidence of inquiry based learning
  3. Positive student relationships

My action steps include:

  1. Regular opportunities for students to collaborate combined with direct instruction on how to collaborate effectively.
  2. Professional Development and book study on inquiry based learning, and Project Based Learning. My goal here is to teach all my science units as PBLs and my challenge is to try at least one PBL in another subject area.
  3. Read the Morning Meeting book and practice and improve upon morning meeting daily! My goal is to never rush morning meeting because that time together is so powerful for relationship building.

I chose to participate in #ObserveMe in the hope that I could collect feedback from peers, parents, and administrators frequently. Then have the time to reflect on that feedback and act on it. I’m struggling with actually getting people to come into my room. I would love to hear your ideas for getting people in my room!

Below is my #ObserveMe sign! I challenge YOU!

#IMMOOC I’m a risk taker.

I’m a risk taker. I love to learn new things from twitter, podcasts, books, friends, and even billboards! I enjoy trying new things with my students and helping them find enjoyment in learning. I truly believe that if you love what you do, you never work a day in your life! I see it as my mission to help children find a love of learning that will last them their lifetime. My purpose is to help them find their passion and explore it. I teach first grade and I constantly think about my students as adults. What I design for them in first grade will help them in their future.

I #innovate4littles in my classroom because they CAN ! The first time I tried Genius Hour, I did it because I just knew it couldn’t be done with littles and boy was I wrong! At the time I taught kindergarten and they ran with it. Littles are natural risk takers because no one has told them they can’t yet and so they believe they can! That year, my littles inspired me to be a risk taker through their hard work, learning, and application of standards and content though self guided experiences in Genius Hour.

I am a risk taker for my littles because they take risks everyday. I empathize with them because it must be so scary! So, I join in and model taking risks, failing, trying again, and hopefully succeeding. I hope that my risk taking inspires them to love learning for the rest of their lives and become innovators of whatever they choose to have a passion for. I hope that my littles never work a day in their lives!

Why I choose to #Innovate4Littles #IMMOOC

I decided to join the #IMMOOC a massive open online course (MOOC) for educators focusing on the book Innovator’s Mindset by George Couros. I saw this hastag flying around twitter and had no idea what it was until recently. I decided to join because it seems to be a transformative PLN. I am super excited to join this community of inspirational and innovative educators.

In January 2017 I started thinking about my teaching and why I make the instructional choices I make. There is a lot of energy right now around being innovative. I worry that this will become a buzz word and lose it’s power. I also worry because there are many who believe young children cannot handle innovative instruction. They are just too little. I had the idea while talking to my bestie, Caitlin McCommons, about this because we believe that littles are capableĀ and #innovate4littles was born! We believe that littles (K-2 students) can participate in the exciting, challenging, fun, innovative learning experiences that big kids get. We also know that these experiences need to be scaled to be developmentally appropriate for our littles. We created #innovate4littles as a way to share and curate innovative practices we use in our classrooms.

As part of the #IMMOOC we were tasked to answer the following question:

Why is innovation in education so crucial today?

I believe that as this world changes, children need to learn to be brave and flexible. There are problems that need to be solved and we need to grow learners who are creative problem solvers. We need to teach children to be brave in the face of a problem and flexible enough to try multiple solutions. We need children to be brave enough to collaborate with people near and far and flexible enough to listen to different perspectives. We need children to be brave enough to take on careers that don’t yet exist and flexible enough to change the careers of the future. In order to teach children to be brave and flexible, I need to be brave and flexible with them. That is why I choose to #Innovate4Littles.