5 Lessons Learned from BYOD with Littles

3 years ago my principal, Dr. Sandy Chambers challenged our staff to participate in a district pilot program in which students would bring devices to school from home (Bring Your Own Device – BYOD). This included a lot of push back, a lot of challenges, and a lot of awesomeness! I’m not gonna lie – I didn’t think it would work in kindergarten! They couldn’t keep track of their jacket! How would they keep track of a device!? It took a few years but I think I have learned some lessons that might help others get going on BYOD with littles!

Lesson #1

Set Expectations 

My school has a contract for each family participating in BYOD. If students don’t follow the guidelines they can lose the privilege of BYOD.  You will need to teach, model, and repeat these expectations with both parents and students frequently. Expectations include:

  • Use the device for learning.
  • Carry it with 2 hands.
  • Only the owner can use it.
  • Devices come to school charged.
  • How often the kid should bring their device.
  • Apps or settings kids need.
  • Digital Citizenship

Lesson #2

Procedures, Procedures, Procedures!

Procedures are what keeps your classroom running smoothly. Teachers have procedures for everything from going to the bathroom to solving student disagreements. BYOD needs its own set of specific procedures. You will need to teach, model, and repeat these procedures frequently. My procedures include:

  • Sign in devices daily so you know what is in your classroom. The sign in let’s me know what I have available each day.
  • Our devices are to stay in student bookbags until we need them.
  • I have a call out to check what students are doing. When I say, “device check!” Students immediately hold their device above their head facing in my direction. If they take a long time or you can see them tapping their devices they are most likely off task.
  • When instructing or giving directions I ask kids to put their devices in “listening mode.” This means they are upside down on their lap.
  • Kindness matters! When responding to other’s work digitally, be kind.

Lesson #3

Allow for students to become experts!

Pick a few apps you want students to have on their BYOD and use them frequently! Let the kids become experts. These apps should become second nature and a “go to” for responses and reflection. Try to pick open ended apps that can be used for creation. Here’s a list of my favorites:

  • Seesaw
  • Chatterpix,
  • Do ink green screen,
  • Felt board

I use and teach other apps too but these are the ones we use the most. I also use raz-kids/kids a-z daily, but it isn’t a creation app.

I also like to keep a running list of things I want to try. Here is my list of creative apps I want to try:

  • aurasma
  • book creator
  • sock puppet
  • coma coma

Lesson #4

Create!

Devices can add to your lessons in meaningful ways. A true blended classroom integrates technology seamlessly. Think creation and not just playing on apps. Use apps that are open ended and allow students to create: draw, photo, video, and write. Playing games and doing rote practice is not a sustainable way to integrate technology. Creation can be used for students to share their learning, respond to questions, or reflect on their learning. Allow students choice in how they share, respond, and reflect. Remember those favorite apps… They are all choices! Students choose them for different reasons depending on what they are trying to communicate.

Lesson #5

Try!

You will find things that work and things that don’t. Be flexible and take a chance. You’ll be surprised what littles can do with devices, they are digital natives after all! Modeling and involving them in the problem solving process is key to success in BYOD for littles.

Please reach out to me if you have any questions about BYOD and littles!

#PBLclouds – the story

In January I participated in a twitter chat #hackingPBL and was so inspired I bought the book Hacking Project Based Learning by Ross Cooper and Erin Murphy. I had learned about Project Based Learning (PBL) in college at SUNY Frediona from Dr. Mira Berkley. I already knew PBL is good for kids. If you don’t know what PBL is read this. I’m not going to get into that now. I want to tell the story of the first time I tried a PBL in my kindergarten class. I reached out to Erin on twitter for a little idea bouncing because she has experience with the logistics of PBLs with kinders. She was very supportive! Fast forward to February. I am a member of the Wake County Teacher Leader Corps (#wakeTLC). We meet 5 times a year to improve our own instruction as well as support other educators in our schools. This year’s focus is a self guided group project. I knew back in November at Fall Convergence #WonderWake I wanted to get into trying PBL in my room. So I joined a group working on PBL. At #wakeTLC in February we listened to Erin Gannnon talk about PBL and she introduced me to a resource bie.org. I began searching right away for ideas to get me going on my first PBL. I found one on weather and clouds. A perfect fit for the weather unit I had just begun. So it was time to change gears! It took me about 2 weeks to wrap my brain around it and plan for it. I decided to photo/video document my learning process and my kinders’ learning process on twitter using #PBLclouds.

Day 1: I launched the PBL reading Eric Carle’s Little Cloud and then let my kinders paint a cloud. I of course forgot to take photos on our first day!

Day 2: After launching, I needed to teach my kinders how to collaborate. We created an anchor chart together.

Day 3: Next, we took a pre-assessment of what they already know about clouds and weather.


Day 4: I strategically grouped my students taking into consideration kinders who bring devices from home and tried to balance my talkers and my thinkers. Their first task as a group was to decide on their roles.

Day 5: I invited our school technology facilitator, Molly Harnden, to come collaborate with me because I was about to give my kinders a mission I had never tried before. I asked my collaborative groups to work together to find a video that teaches about the different types of clouds. The task included using YouTubeKids to find 4 different videos about the types of clouds and deciding together which one was the best. This was a very involved task and required my kinders to be critical of the information they found as well as reaching a group decision. Each member of the groups had a role and each role had a specific task for this mission. Leader – listened to each member’s opinion of the best video and decided which video got the most votes. Recorder –  wrote down the title of the video they chose. Digital leader – worked the iPad to show videos. I chose this mission because my kinders were using YouTube already for entertainment. So I taught them to use a safer version – YouTubeKids and how to use it in an effective way for learning.


Day 6-8: Each group shared the video they chose and why they picked it with the whole group using Reflector 2. This took 2 days longer than I anticipated. I had to learn to be flexible!

Day 9-14: We went outside to observe the clouds. Each group kept track of the clouds they saw using a graph. There were protocols for each role during observations. Leader – listened as every shared and decided what the recorder would record based on what they heard. Recorder – recorded on the graph.  Noise Monitor – used a pointing protocol to make sure that the group members were taking turns to talk.

Day 9-10: The groups built models of the cloud types we learned about with cotton balls. I had done this activity for the last 4 years but this year was different! In the past, it was very teacher directed and I had to tell them what to do with the cotton balls to make each type of cloud. This year, they worked with their groups and didn’t need my help at all! They were even able to model 6 types of clouds where in the past we only did 4. The groups even came up with a way to color the clouds black for the storm clouds!

Day 12: This is where karma was on my side! We scheduled a Science Fun for Everyone field trip at the beginning of the year. The theme was meteorology! I was so proud of my kinders being able to answer the scientist’s questions and make connections to what we were doing.


Day 13: We watched a few videos of TV meteorologists and made notes of what we noticed. We watched each video 3 times. The first time was just to watch. The second time I asked my kinders to think about what they saw in the video. The third time I asked them to pay close attention to what they heard the meteorologist say. We made a list.

Day 14: We went over the list we made the day before then the groups decided on what they were going to say in their video and who was going to say it. Each group took a video using a green screen for their weather forecast. Molly was a big help teaching my class to take videos!

 

Day 15: Groups used Kiddle (another great resource brought to us by Molly!) to search for images to use behind their Green Screen video. Molly and I taught the groups how to use the DoInk Green Screen App to create their video and the groups shared their finished products. We critiqued each video using the list we made on day 13.

Day 16: I was able to get a local, self employed meteorologist to come talk to all 100 kindergarteners at #WeAreBrierCreek! Big thanks to Josh Nagelberg for coming out to talk to such a big group of kids! They loved seeing the connection between what they are learning and a real life meteorologist!

Stay tuned for future posts on this PBL. My plan is to write one as a reflection of how #PBLclouds went, another as a reflection of lessons learned from #PBLclouds and Hacking Project Based Learning, and another with my next steps and where I’m going in my PBL journey!

Questions or comments on #PBLclouds? Post below! Thanks!