#Eclipse2017

Anyone out there still working on their plan for The Great American Eclipse? In my area we have the opportunity to see about 90% of the total eclipse and I am TOTALLY nerding out! North Carolina just rolled out a new science standard for first grade 1.E.1 – Recognize the features and patterns of the earth/moon/sun system as observed from earth. This means #Eclipse2017 fits in my standards!!!! I’m just now getting my details worked out and thought I would share them. Please share yours in the comments section!

Wonder

One of my goals this year is inquiry based instruction. I’m going to begin our day by collecting questions my firsties have about the eclipse. I’m sure they have heard people talking about it and I want to gather what they know and wonders. This may require some last minute scrambling to make sure I address misconceptions and questions I’m not prepared for.

Video

Discovery Education has gathered some great video and image  resources for the eclipse. I’ll start with the one titled “Solar Eclipse.” We’ll watch it once and then I’ll have my firsties write one thing they learned on a sheet of paper. We will use the DE Spotlight on Strategy (SOS) Snowball Fight to review our learning from the video. Students will crumple their paper into a ball, throw it in the middle of the circle and on my cue pull one sheet of paper out and read it. We’ll then watch the video again. After a second video, students will pull 2 snowballs from the circle and add an idea from the video to their friends’ snowballs. We’ll then have some share time to discuss what we noticed from the video. You will probably be able to find a few good videos on You Tube if you don’t have access to Discovery Education.

Article

Reading A-Z has some great science content on Science A-Z. Their July issue has a short 1 page article I’m going to have my firsties read in pairs. After reading, they will use Flipgrid to share a selfie video of the most interesting thing from the article. If you don’t have access to this great resource, they offer a free 2 week trial! Also, Front Row is free and they have a few different short, leveled articles about the eclipse you can share.

Model the eclipse

I have a handful of flashlights and quarters I’m bringing to school tomorrow. Students will use these materials to work in groups of 3-4 to make a video of what they think will happen during the eclipse. They will post this video on Seesaw.

Eclipse Observation

I have this amazing observation sheet from my EDU buddy Bill Ferriter. I have made 5 copies for each student. We will go outside to observe for about 30 seconds. Then we will come inside to work on our observation sheets. We will go out for observation 5 different times during the eclipse so my firsties can see the changes in the sky and environment. Each time we come inside to reflect on observations, we will discuss what we saw and make a prediction of what it will look like next. I’ll have a student share their drawing  and together we will draw our predictions on a portable dry erase board.

Extras!

I just bought a Google Cardboard and they have a Virtual Reality App for the eclipse. It costs $0.99 but I think that is worth it! I only have 1 cardboard so they will have to take turns. I’m doing this before the eclipse will help curb their desire to look at the eclipse outside.


Discovery Education also has a bunch of other videos I can use for my firsties to gather more information. They are also streaming the eclipse live on the Science Channel if it is cloudy or something happens that we can’t go outside. We can also view this when the eclipse is over as we reflect on the experience.

If we have time, we will make this to help us act out the movements of the earth and moon around the sun and try to make it show a solar eclipse.

Mystery Science also has a great activity with all the content you will need!

Reflect

I’m going to use another DE SOS for students to reflect on their experience. I’ll have them recreate the eclipse with art materials then tell about it with the “3 truths and a lie” SOS. I’m going to have them start with 1 truth and 1 lie and add to it time permitting. We’ll write the truths and lies flipbook style so we can hang them in the hall and others can guess which is the truth and which is the lie and flip it up to see.

I also have other reflection ideas so this may change or, better yet, I’ll give them a choice. It’ll depend on how everything goes tomorrow.

  • SOS 6 Word Story
  • Another FlipGrid
  • Chatterpix
  • Seesaw

Note: It is NEVER safe to look directly at the sun! I have parent permission and NASA approved eclipse glasses for each of my firsties. We are going outside to view the eclipse. I will (obviously) be very strict about making sure they know the damage that can be done if they do not leave their glasses on their eyes. I’ve done my research and know that if they look with a naked eye they won’t feel pain because the retina doesn’t have pain receptors and they will have blurry or even lose their vision permanently. I’m going to be very up front and honest with my firsties and I trust them to follow my directions.

PS – I’ll take pictures tomorrow and edit this post after!

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Hook, Line, and Sinker

It’s Tuesday before I track back in. My teacher work days start on Thursday and I’m getting myself in the mindset to begin fresh in my classroom in 2017.

When I began this blog a month ago my plan was to review the NC teacher evaluation standards to try to better understand how I’m evaluated as an educator. Some of my posts have gone on small tangents but I think that’s ok because telling my stories shows how I meet each standard. After this, I’ll be telling more stories


(because stories are what’s important) about my classroom and reflecting on some professional books I’m reading. Today I’m exploring:

Standard 5: Teachers Reflect on their Practice – Teachers analyze student learning, Teachers link professional growth to professional goals, Teachers function effectively in a complex, dynamic environment.

The whole purpose of this blog for me is to reflect on my practice.

I’m sure I don’t need to say it out loud because every teacher does this but for the record – I look at what my students already know and analyze it to figure out what I need to teach them. I do this through formative assessments, observation, and conversations with my students.

I’m going to tell you a secret: at some point in the last 2 years I lost some of my passion and my “why” of teaching. Seriously! I lost it. I couldn’t find it anywhere… I tried looking. I’ll admit to you why – I didn’t have professional goals.  This year I got myself back into my professional learning and trying new things and even reading (professional and personal reading). Guess what… my passion is back! My “why” came back! I’m more amped and ready to get to school this year! My goal this year is to make learning more playful for my students. I started this year reading Purposeful Play by Kristine Mraz, Alison Porcelli, and Cheryl Tyler. I’ll admit, I’m a slow reader so I only just finished it last week. But it’s a great book and I highly recommend it (even for upper grades teachers)! All kids like to play. This book isn’t just about choice time and centers. It’s about making all learning all day more playful. I’ll post about this book after I finish the NC teacher standards. The other thing that changed for me is Twitter (give me a follow if you don’t already)! Once I joined twitter and began hanging out there and connecting with educators from all over and hearing their excitement, my “why” came back to me. I’m a teacher for my students. They’re obviously my why and always have been. But this year, I’m into them more. I want to build relationships and get to know their interests more. I’ve enjoyed twitter chats. I’m still slow at it and not consistently participating in any. I’m looking to grow my PLN so please comment some people I should follow, hashtags to check, and your favorite twitter chat (with the day and time)!

Our world is complex and dynamic and therefore our classrooms must be as well. It is our task as teachers to help prepare students for the fast paced world they will be entering. As teachers we need to embrace the complex and dynamic world and make our classrooms that way but first we need to be able to function in it. I’m flexible and I embrace change. It might take me a while to embrace it because I like to understand it but once I do, LOOK OUT! I’m a jump in the deep end kind of person! I will take new initiatives hook, line, and sinker (when I’m ready)! I’ve heard of teacher blogs. I’ve read a few but not consistently. I wanted to start one but never did until last month because I didn’t think mine would be any good and I wouldn’t have any readers. But I’ve grown. My blog is not for you #sorrynotsorry it’s for me. My next goal for blogging is to become an avid reader of other’s blogs. Right now I follow Kim Collins, Bill Ferriter, and George Couros. So, if your reading this… give me some ideas of who else to read and follow them.

Can’t stop… Won’t stop…

I’m already excited to post again. I was nervous about this at first. I feel self conscious putting my thoughts in a public space but a new PLN friend encouraged me – this is for me.  Thanks Bill! Also, I learned a new trick – links in my post (don’t laugh I’m learning!).

My plan for this blog is for it to stand as my portfolio. I want to collect my growth and best work all while growing a positive digital footprint. So today I want to look closely at the standards I’m evaluated on and see if I can understand them better.

Standard 1 – teachers demonstrate leadership – classroom, school, profession, advocate, high ethical standards

I think that leading in my classroom and school and upholding high ethical standards comes easily for me. They’re kind of a given… A duh!moment.  How could I teach and not lead my students or take on some leadership role in my school? I don’t think I’d be effective… Educators have long be held to high ethical standards. We’re role models for our students. The families and community we serve expect a lot out of us. These are the easy sub standards.

The ones that make us stand out are leading in the profession and advocating for schools and students. My goal in life is to grow up to be just like my all time favorite teacher Dr. Mira Berkley. She is my most favorite professor from college. She is a guru of early childhood education. She is passionate and a leader in the field as well as an advocate for everything developmentally appropriate. I want to be all of those things! In my near future I plan to return to school for my doctorate degree then pursue a career in educating future educators. I see this blog as my way of pushing forward to becoming more of a leader in the profession and then advocating for students and schools will come…

Standard 2 – teachers establish a respectful environment for a diverse population of students –  positive nurturing relationship, embrace diversity, treat students as individuals, adapt teaching for special needs, collaborate with families

In my humble opinion this standard needs to be observed overtime and needs to be part of a teachers belief system. This isn’t something you can fake. You have to believe that diversity is an important part of a community. I work hard to create a classroom community each year with my young kinders. We regularly talk about the differences and similarities between us. I encourage them to all be friends and to include each other during play. I reach out to my families to learn about their home cultures and traditions. We include those in our classroom discussions. When it comes to diversity positivity is key. I think that diversity comes in many shapes and sizes. It isn’t all the color of our skin. We also have to look at religions, socioeconomic status, and other cultural aspects. Every student in my class is important to me and so is their happiness and well-being. Of course I care about their academics, but the whole child is in my classroom not just their brain. I give hugs when they need love, food when they are hungry, sleep time when they are tired, and band-aids fix most everything else. 🙂 When it comes to academics, I challenge my students as they need it at their own levels. I differentiate lessons, center activities, and homework. None of this is easy but it’s the right way to do it and it’s what needs to be done for the kids. At the end of the day… it’s all about the kids.

So I’ve come to realize that talking about the standards is going to take me a while and in an effort not to make this post a mile long, I’m going to stop here.  I’ll be back soon to talk my way through some of the other teaching standards.

Please comment with your thoughts on these standards!