Coding Unplugged – A number sorting computer

I learned an amazing coding activity at the #NCSTA17 conference in Greensboro, NC in October. The activity is from csunplugged.org. The mat works like a computer. It has rules and paths the information must follow. I was mind blown the first time we did it as adults at the conference and I immediately had the idea to use this as one of my comparing numbers introductions. #math1NBT3

The first time I did this, I taped the pattern out on the floor copying it from the photo I took at the conference. I didn’t want to spend the money making the cloth if it didn’t work. I was worried that my firsties wouldn’t get it since they would need to know right from left in order for the computer to be successful. I was so surprised! They did not want the computer to “break” and were very careful to chose the correct direction and help each other figure out where to go on the coding mat.

I bought this drop cloth at Lowes. I painted the pattern with tempra paint from my classroom. I copied it from the photo I took at the conference. It was pretty easy except I didn’t eyeball the paths correctly and ended up with 2 curved ones when they should all be straight. I also had a few cat prints from my dear sweet 15 year old torti cat, Calypso, being nosy and walking across the mat.

The kids DID NOT MIND! They love hearing all the crazy stories about my pets!

The first time we did this, I gave the kids single digit numbers 1-6 that I knew they would be able to compare and put in order easily. I had them line up out of order at the starting end of the mat. I asked the kids who were not on the computer to tell me what they noticed:

  • “They are 1 digit numbers.”
  • “They are out of order.”

So far so good! I explained the rules and paths on the computer and gave reminders for right and left so the knew which direction to move. At each step forward I had them stop and the observers to notice any changes (Nothing changed except the order of the numbers. And they were still out of order.) I slowed this WAY down. One step at a time asking them to compare and decide: right or left? By the time they go to the other end of the computer they were just as amazed as I was at the conference that this unplugged computer WORKED!!!

The next time we did this, I gave them teen numbers which I knew they were familiar with from kindergarten and had 1 or 2 numbers missing (i.e. 11, 13, 16, 17, 18 19). I kept it at a slow pace. Taking 1 step at a time and comparing and following paths and asking the observers to notice any changes. They were less surprised that the numbers ended up in order and more concerned that some numbers were missing in the order. This led to a great conversation about comparing numbers and the numbers that come between other numbers.

We moved on from there comparing more 2 digit numbers. I gave out another set of cards with 2 digit numbers specifically chosen so that it didn’t matter if they only compared 1 of the digits, it would still work out in order (i.e. 12, 23, 34, 45, 67, 89). I anticipated this would be a common misconception with comparing 2 digit numbers. We talked about always comparing with the tens number firs then the ones if the tens were equal.

The next set of cards had more random 2 digit numbers. I had them draw the base ten picture for this number so they could begin comparing both the number and a picture of that number and visualizing each 2 digit number. The last set of cards had just base ten pictures and they compared the images.

Each time I gave out a new set of cards, I called different students to be in the computer so that everyone could have a chance to observe and notice and participate. Each time we worked the computer, they were able to follow the rules and paths faster. Our observation skills even got keener as they noticed mistakes in the right/left stepping and corrected their friends so we didn’t “break” the computer.

Please share other unplugged computer science or coding activities or ideas you have for this activity in the comments!

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Scooters, Science, Goal Setting

Yesterday as I stood in my driveway waiting for AAA to jump start my husband’s car, I watched as the neighbor boy (5 years old) played on his scooter in his driveway. The street leading into our cul-de-sac is a hill and his driveway is also sloped. Our driveways have a little bump so rain water goes down the storm drains instead of flooding our driveways. He went to the top of his driveway and realized he only needed to push once to make it to his garage. Next he went to the bottom of that bump and got frustrated with the number of pushes he needed to make it over the bump before he could coast to the garage. He went a little ways into the cul-de-sac and pushed off. He had to push again to make it over the bump in the driveway and then coast to the garage. He went farther into the cul-de-sac and pushed off. He made it to the peak of the driveway bump but didn’t make it over it. He went to the top of the cul-de-sac as his sister yelled for him to come back inside. This time he made it all the way down to the driveway, up and over the bump, and all the way into his garage. I could tell by the look on his face as he rode faster and faster down the hill that he was so proud of his accomplishment. He knew before he reached the garage that he was successful.

The whole time I watched as he problem solved, tried multiple strategies, failed, made adjustments, but never gave up until he succeeded my teacher brain was going wild!

  1. Wow! I can use this story to teach forces and motion in science to my firsties!
  2. Woah! This kid has some serious growth mindset and was so determined to race to his garage with only one push. He never once gave up or thought he was a terrible scooter rider.
  3. If kids can use these skills when they play why not for academics? Why aren’t academics at school approached through play?
  4. How can I use this kid’s perseverance and apply it to myself?

Yes, I plan to tell this story to my firsties and see if they can apply it to our science unit as well as pull out the character strengths he used while working to solve this problem.

I believe in play based learning as best practice for littles. Kids learn so much from their play. We as teachers need to pull our curriculum objectives out of children’s natural play. We need to guide and inspire play where children can apply curriculum knowledge to their games. Play allows children to feel safe in order to take risks. Risks allow children to learn and grow in deeper ways.

His perseverance inspires me. I am a goal setter but I often don’t make clear plans to take the necessary steps to meet my goals. I need to be more mindful about making plans and following through on the steps I need to take to meet my goals. I also need to take time to reflect on my progress and make adjustments to my plan in order to meet my goal. I need to go farther up the hill to get over the bumps in the path toward my goals.

What does this story make you think about?

Building Relationships …a work in progress…

Author’s Note: I’m not proud of the post below. Actually, I’m embarrassed by it. But learning and growth must be shared! This is about to get real………

I started reading The Curious Classroom by Harvey “Smokey” Daniels. And of course it begins talking student relationships. I have good relationships with my kids. They know I love them and they love me. I try to get to know my kids outside of school and academics. I share my life outside our classroom with them.

In the first chapter, Daniels brings up a quote I’ve heard many times before by Donald Graves,

You are not ready to teach a child until you know ten things about her life outside of school.

It got me thinking. I actually went back to that quote 4 times in the time it took me to read the 18 pages of chapter 1. Do I know 10 things about each of my Firsties??? Of course I do! ……… WAIT! Do I REALLY know 10 thing about each of my kids? I decided to make a list.

I left off names and things I know to keep some privacy for my students. Below reflects what I was able to come up with after thinking about my students for a short time. The number on the left represents a student and the number in parenthesis is the amount of things I could come up with.

1.  (5)

2.  (5)

3.  (7)

4. (4)

5. (5)

6. (8)

7.  (4)

8.  (4)

9. (2)

10. (3)

11. (2)

12. (3)

13. (5)

14. (6)

15. (3)

16. (3)

17. (4)

18. (3)

I have a lot of work to do. I’ll update this post as I work toward my goal.

The #IMMOOC experience

For me the #IMMOOC experience was a chance to read the book again, get into some consistent blogging, and connect with educators around the world who share a passion for student learning. I absolutely loved the Youtube live videos. It was amazing to see and hear people live while tweeting and commenting in the video chat. The twitter chats were so fast! I’m used to slower ones that I can read every tweet and I just had to let go of the fact that that was not going to happen. I enjoyed the sidebar conversations. And that they were actually allowed and encouraged! I embraced the opportunity for some personalized professional development!

I am going to try blogging weekly. I’m going to attempt to do that until the end of 2017. I’ve had my blog since November 2016 so I’m going to round out year 1 with 1 post a week and then revisit this goal in 2018. I’m also setting a goal to continue reading education books and blogs on a regular basis! I’m going to start with a book study on The Curious Classroom with my team, bestie Caitlin McCommons, and our IRT Jessica VonDerHeide. I’m really excited to dig into this book and work on growth for my PDP goal of including more inquiry based learning in my classroom.

After this process of connecting, learning, and growing through the #IMMOOC family, I’m left with a question. It has been on my mind the whole 6 weeks and I haven’t found a good time to bring it up. How does all of this innovation fit in to equity in education? Is innovation in education yet another way that sets communities apart from one another?

#eduawesome #IMMOOC blog posts

  1. Michelle Schade – I started reading her blog because she commented on my first #IMMOOC blog post. I feel like we have so much in common even though we are in totally different positions. I can’t pick just one post. I connected to everything she wrote during this process. I’m so excited to see what she does next! I’ll continue to read your blog as long as you continue to write! @MichelleSchad20
  2. It Starts with a Screw – Kristin wrote about setting up a workbench in her kindergarten classroom and referenced my all time favorite children’s book What do you do with an Idea?. I’m so inspired by her risk taking and connections her environment makes to the real world. What an amazing opportunity these kindergarteners have to work and build on a real workbench with real tools. I can’t wait to see what they do next! Please continue to share your journey! @KLHouston3
  3. I think Katie Martin’s homework blog post won #IMMOOC this season. Everyone connected with it. Everyone shared it – even people not in #IMMOOC we’re sharing that post. It almost broke the internet! But seriously, why are we still giving homework?!?! @KatieMartinEDU

Passion > Stress (3 blog posts under 250 words – post 3) #IMMOOC

Stress:

  • Requirements I don’t see the value in
  • Paperwork
  • Last minute changes
  • Meetings on meetings on meetings

Love:

  • Learning
  • Connecting with educators
  • Reading
  • Shareing

I work a lot. I work all day at school and most nights I come home and work more. I spend countless hours on weekends working. My husband tells me I work too much. But the thing is I love what I do. I’m passionate about learning (mine and my students). I never feel like I’m working because I enjoy it and I’m passionate about it.

I’m passionate about learning. I seek out learning opportunities. I attend EdCamps, look for local educators conferences, read books,  read blogs, write, and  tweet. I seek out new ways to teach my students. I seek out ways to connect standards to their interests.

I’m passionate about integrating technology in learning experiences. I’m on my phone a lot. But I use it as a tool for learning. I connect with others through my phone. I take pictures of what I’m learning and what my students are learning to share. I seek out new technology tools to integrate with my students. I’m currently learning how to integrate coding into my curriculum (please share if you’re an expert!) I recently tried coding unplugged to teach my students to compare 2 digit numbers.

I know the things that stress me out are must dos and they aren’t going away. M y love and passion greatly out weigh the things that stress me out.

Strengths Based Approach (3 blog posts under 250 words – post 2) #IMMOOC

Feedback is the most influential, powerful practice teachers can implement in their classrooms. Research (Hattie) shows that no single other practice in a classroom has a greater impact on student learning than feedback. However, how often does feedback come in the form of negatives.

  • “You need to start your sentence with a capital.”
  • “Did that sound right? Try a different strategy.”
  • “Check your counting. You made a silly mistake. “

I’m guilty of this type of feedback myself. I think I’m helping my students. But what message are they actually hearing? I worry that it could be:

  • “I’m a terrible writer.”
  • “I can’t read.”
  • “I’m not good enough.”

I have to be mindful daily to focus on my students strengths. It’s a decision I have to make every 5 seconds: tell them what they did great or what they need to fix.

I find that I get my fristies’ attention and interest when I start with something they did great. They love to hear how amazing they are. I try to make a point of telling each of my firsties something I love about them every day. They need this positive affirmation.

Today on flipgrid, one of my firsties was WAY off in her response but I didn’t even address it right away. I started by telling her how amazing she is at selfies (and she’s better than I am!) She lit up and hung on my every word after that! We hit her grow area after she was able to glow!

#NCSTAlearns #NCSTA17 #NSTA17

I just got back from the North Carolina Science Teachers Association (NCSTA) annual conference and my heart and my mind are full! The links below are to my notes from each session I attended.

I learned to code with out a computer or device. And immediately knew how to bring it back to my students. We’re going to do this exact activity with 2 digit numbers next week as we start our comparing 2 digit number unit (NBT1.3).

I’m a Harry Potter nerd so naturally I went to see a real Madam Trelawney show me the science behind magical creatures, levitation, and potions!

I shared my resources for the new to first grade science unit – Earth in the Universe (E1.1). And while at the Elementary share-a-thon, shared the table with a new friend – Lindsay Rice. We stuck together for the rest of the conference and it was so nice to wander with a familiar face!

We learned that you shouldn’t go to sessions by exhibitors. They’ll want you to buy there stuff. And their stuff is expensive!

I learned about the benefits of graffiti for vocab learning and was inspired to make visual vocabulary displays! (coming soon to my classroom!)

I connected with some other educators after day one of the conference.

I’m inspired by Lindsay to have my students cross their mid-line to improve brain function and make vocabulary fun, engaging, and artistic.

I shared my learning on PBL and technology tools that support inquiry to a group of educators. It was my first time presenting and I’m pleased with how it went, but I have a lot of room for growth! My goal for my first presentation was to get at least 1 participant to join twitter or seesaw and I got 2 for each! Whoot whoot!!

I ended the conference building hinge joints, solving a problem like an astronaut, and attempting to build a balanced mobile (fail). I have to teach that last one soon so I’m going to get some practice in!

I’m grateful for the opportunity to attend this conference and to attend some meaningful sessions. But I’m even more thankful for the connections I made with educators from Union County, Charlotte Mecklenburg Schools, Wilmington, Durham, and the community college network. I’ve heard that the people you meet at conferences are more important than the sessions you attend. This being my first conference on my own. I’m thrilled with the connections I made. Any conferences I attend in the future (alone or in groups) I will 100% form bonds with educators I don’t know!

Thanks to everyone who attended #NCSTAlearns. I’ll see you next year!

“I failed my way to success” #IMMOOC

I teach little kids. Modeling EVERYTHING is important. I model reading strategies, writing conventions, counting methods, steps in a process. Every. Single. Day. Multiple. Times. A. Day.  Modeling my learning is just as important. I preach growth mindset, the power of yet, and the miracle of mistakes all the time. I try to see into the future and predict the mistakes my littles will make then plan ahead to make those mistakes as I’m teaching my mini-lessons. These moments can be powerful for them. But I’ll tell you what, those kids are smart! They can see right though me! They know I made that mistake on purpose and they know I know better!

It is far more powerful to make natural mistakes in front of students. I don’t play those off as if I meant to. I model the process of how I realized there was a mistake and what I’m going to do to fix it and learn from it! My kids help me realize my mistakes and they cheer me on as they observe my process to improve.

My littles know I’m on twitter, they know I blog, they know I read books about education, they know I go to teacher conferences and workshops both to teach other teachers and to learn from other teachers. My kids know that teaching that their learning is my passion. During our morning meeting time we share what we’re learning, mistakes we made, and our curiosities. It’s important for me to be open and honest with them. I don’t tell them kid friendly things. I share the real things in my life that I’m learning, my actual mistakes, and what I’m actually wondering about. My kids know I just bought a house and I’m struggling to work my front garden to make it look nice and keep the weeds out (they even offered to come help).

When kids see the adults near them learning, making mistakes, and improving they will realize that’s what life is all about. My goal is for my students to learn to enjoy the struggle and lean into it. Our favorite quote is from Thomas Edison, “I failed my way to success.” It’s our mantra.

What are you learning right now?

#IMMOOC I’m a risk taker.

I’m a risk taker. I love to learn new things from twitter, podcasts, books, friends, and even billboards! I enjoy trying new things with my students and helping them find enjoyment in learning. I truly believe that if you love what you do, you never work a day in your life! I see it as my mission to help children find a love of learning that will last them their lifetime. My purpose is to help them find their passion and explore it. I teach first grade and I constantly think about my students as adults. What I design for them in first grade will help them in their future.

I #innovate4littles in my classroom because they CAN ! The first time I tried Genius Hour, I did it because I just knew it couldn’t be done with littles and boy was I wrong! At the time I taught kindergarten and they ran with it. Littles are natural risk takers because no one has told them they can’t yet and so they believe they can! That year, my littles inspired me to be a risk taker through their hard work, learning, and application of standards and content though self guided experiences in Genius Hour.

I am a risk taker for my littles because they take risks everyday. I empathize with them because it must be so scary! So, I join in and model taking risks, failing, trying again, and hopefully succeeding. I hope that my risk taking inspires them to love learning for the rest of their lives and become innovators of whatever they choose to have a passion for. I hope that my littles never work a day in their lives!